Are you due for a Skills Audit?

Do you have valid evidence of the current skill sets of your workforce?

A staff skills audit can be used to identify the skills an organisation currently has, and where the skill gaps lie in order for an organisation to meet its strategic objectives. Each person who works in an organisation has a dynamic and unique skill base. Not only is it important for the organisation to know what each persons skill set and skill levels are, but it is also important to know how these skills are utilised as part of his/her work role.

Are you easily able to identify the gaps between your current skill availability, and the future skills your organisation needs in order to meet its 5 year strategic plan?

The outcome is a workforce plan that aligns with the organisations strategic plan, identifies where training is needed, and highlights areas where new talent is required.

Having a solid employee retention strategy is key.

There are three core pillars to a successful retention strategy:

  1. Training your staff
  2. Recognising your staff
  3. Rewarding your staff

Are you easily able to identify the gaps between your current skill availability, and the future skills your organisation needs in order to meet its 5 year strategic plan?

The outcome is a workforce plan that aligns with the organisations strategic plan, identifies where training is needed, and highlights areas where new talent is required.

In order to train your staff, you need to identify any skills gaps they might have.  A skills audit is more than simply collecting qualifications information. A good skills audit enables organisational leaders to build a comprehensive skills matrix and see whether each employee within the company possesses the competencies and actual skills to fulfil his/her workplace role.

By not doing a skills audit making effective decisions about skills management is nearly impossible. Without the audit companies are relying on methods that are subjective, inconsistent, not tailored to specific job skills, or the results are not meaningful enough to support objective and accurate decision making.

Author: SAC Online

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